Tag Archives: Scott Stevens

BRENDAN SHANAHAN: THE COMPLETE PLAYER

by Ron Spence

I consider Jerome Iginla the best player in the NHL today – a complete player.

He can score, set up linemates, defend his teammates, lead, etc.

He follows in the tradition of Gordie Howe, Wendel Clarke, etc.

I think that one of the best ever – at playing this style of hockey – is New Jersey’s Brendan Shanahan.

He is durable (13th overall in games played), can score (11th overall), and set up (50th overall) – making him 24th overall in total points.

Before re-donning his old Devils’ uniform, Shanahan will have played in 1490 games and have scored 650 goals [20 goals in 19 consecutive seasons] along with 690 assists.

Shanahan also has accumulated 2460 penalty minutes. Brendan plays an aggressive style of game and can fight, taking on the champs such as Bob Probert and Donald Brashear.

He is number one – since the stat was first counted in 2007 – in Gordie Howe hat tricks with 9. Tkachuk, Iginla and Morrow are next with only 5.

But, he doesn’t believe in goon fighting. He told Gino Reda.

“I happen to like fighting, in the game of hockey, to a certain degree. I’ve never been a big fan of two guys going on the ice and starting a fight for the sake of starting a fight, and neither one of them are angry but they both feel that they’ll get in trouble or lose their jobs…but as far as two players, a player protecting a teammate, protecting a code for himself, I think it’s something that’s unique about hockey, I’m excited about two players who’re truly inspired to drop their gloves and go at it, like … in the Stanley Cup Finals when Jarome Iginla and Vincent Lecavalier dropped their gloves, that pulled me out of my seat, that’s not a bad thing, but I think that’s great, and if we just eliminate some of the planned fights or the staged fights, I do think that hockey’s a unique sport where we’ve always been able to defend ourselves, I happen to like that opportunity to defend myself or my teammates, and I don’t think that that’s an option that should go away.”

Brendan Shanahan is also a respected  leader [Stevie Y was Detroit’s captain, but Shanahan was one of their leaders.] and a visionary.

Shanahan convened a group during the NHL lockout to discuss the game and how it could be improved. The “summit” led to the formation of the competition committee, in which players were given a real say in the direction the game was supposed to take.

Shanahan will be embraced when he re-dons his Devils’ jersey. It will be a return to his roots.

His first year in New Jersey, the 18-year-old scored 26 points in 65 games. His second season – 1988-89 – he had 22 goals and 50 points, followed by 30 goals and 29 goals. He also averaged over 131 penalty minutes a season during his four years in the Garden State.

shanahanopcrccourtesy of freewebs.com

The thing to remember is that New Jersey has retired only two numbers: Ken Danyko’s and Scott Stevens’ – both hard-nosed work horses. And Shanahan fits into this mold.

Ironically, it was Shanahan who indirectly helped New Jersey to win their 3 Stanley Cups – after he had left the franchise.

In July, 1991, he signed with the St. Louis Blues as a Restricted Free Agent.

New Jersey’s compensation should have been draft picks, but the Blues had given five first round draft picks to the Washington Capitals after signing Scott Stevens. This was the previous year, and with no first round picks for four seasons, the Blues offered: Cujo, Rod Brind’Amour and two draft picks.

The Devils weren’t interested and convinced an arbitrator that Stevens belonged in Tony Soprano country.

Stevens, of course, went on to anchor the Devils’ defense for 13 seasons and 3 Stanley Cups. He also won the Conn Smythe Trophy (Playoff MVP) in 2000.

So, there won’t be any boos when Shanahan returns to his first team – the prodical son returns.

Even Rangers’ fans won’t boo the 40-year-old who Glen Sather wasn’t smart enough to re-sign.

HOCKEY SALARIES: 1987 1988 1989 1990

by Ron Spence

When Bob Goodenough took over the NHLPA in February, 1990, he introduced salary disclosure. It’s something that’s taken for granted today.

How important was it?

Wayne Greztky’s father, Walter admitted to Terry Jones: “I knew Wayne was getting traded days before he did because Nelson Skalbania phoned me and asked, ‘How much does Wayne make?’

I said ‘Why?’

He said ‘Because Peter’s shopping him to the highest bidder.’

I said ‘No he’s not.’

He said ‘Yes he is.’

That was during the 1988 Stanley Cup finals – a year and a half before salary disclosure.

Of course Pocklington knew how much his star was making, as did Wayne and his father, but it wasn’t public knowledge like it is today.

Hockey Zone Plus has compiled a comprehensive database of some 2500 players who’ve played in the NHL from 1989 until the present.

Also, a hockey fan, who calls himself Ogopogo, has located copies of Sport magazine, which ceased publishing in 2000. In his issues were the: 1987, 1990, and 1991 NHL salaries.

I have included the Hockey Zone’s 1990 salaries, along with those listed by Sport.

I would note, however, that the two lists for 1990 aren’t always the same – some are calculated in American funds, some Canadian. But, I am including both, as they provide a good idea of NHL salaries at that time.

I would ask the reader to also note, that the years from 1987 until 1990, was the time in which Offer Sheets were first being presented.


SPORT – June, 1987

1. Wayne Gretzky – Oilers – $950,000 CDN – (converted to $717,250 USD)
2. Marcel Dionne – Rangers – $700,000
3. Mike Bossy – Islanders – $650,000
4. Bryan Trottier – Islanders – $625,000
5. Dave Taylor – Kings – $600,000
6. Mario Lemieux – Penguins – $550,000
5. Denis Potvin – Islanders – $550,000
8. Mike Liut – Whalers – $450,000
9. Rod Langway – Capitals – $400,000
10. Barry Pederson – Canucks – $350,000

SPORT – June, 1989

1. Gretzky – Kings – $2 million
2. Lemieux – Penguins – $1.5 million
3. Trottier – Islanders – $950,000
4. Taylor – Kings – $700,000
5. Dionne – Rangers – $600,000
6. Liut – Whalers – $550,000
7. Goulet – Nordiques – $510,000
8. Messier – Oilers – $510,000
9. Savard – Blackhawks – $500,000
10. Coffey – Penguins – $485,000
11. Duguay – Kings – $475,000
12. Hawerchuk – Jets – $467,500
13. Stastny – Nordiques – $446,250
14. Carpenter – Bruins – $425,000
15. LaFontaine – Islanders – $425,000
16. Gustafsson – Capitals – $410,000
17. Stevens -Capitals – $400,000
18. Pederson – Canucks – $400,000
19. Bourque – Bruins – $380,000
20. Fuhr – Oilers – $340,000
20. Robinson – Canadiens – $340,000

SPORT – June, 1990

1. Gretzky – Kings – $2.72 milion
2. Lemieux – Penguins – $2.15 million
3. Chelios – Canadiens – $1 million
4. Trottier – Islanders – $975,000
5. Taylor – Kings – $950,000
6. Bourque – Bruins – $925,000
7. Messier – Oilers – $875,000
8. Nicholls – Rangers – $725,000
9. Yzerman – Red Wings – $700,000
10. Goulet – Nordiques/Blackhawks – $600,000
11. Carson – Oilers – $585,000
12. Robinson – Kings – 550,000
13. Savard – Blackhawks – $525,000
14. Dineen – Whalers – $510,000
15. Wilson – Blackhawks – $500,000
16. Hextall – Flyers – $500,000
17. Kerr – Flyers – $500,000
18. Coffey – Penguins – $485,000
19. Stastny – Nordiques – $480,000
20. Hawerchuk – Jets – $462,000

HOCKEY ZONE PLUS – 1989-90 (U.S. Dollars)

1. Lemieux – Penguins – $2,000,000

2. Gretzky – Kings – $1,720,000

3. Messier – Oilers – $855,271

4. Yzerman – Red Wings – $700,000

5. Trottier – Islanders – $ 575,000

6. Robinson – Kings – $550,000

7. Savard – Blackhawks – $525,000

8. Goulet – Nordiques/Blackhawks – $517,980

9. Bourque – Bruins – $500,000

10. Hextall – Flyers – $500,000

11. Wilson – Blackhawks – $500,000

12. Taylor – Kings- $500,000

13. Kerr – Flyers – $500,000

14. Chelios – Canadiens – $496,398

15. Coffey – Penguins – $450,000

16. Liut – Capitals – $445,000

17. Salming – Maple Leafs – $435,000

18. Kurri – Oilers – $431,650

19. Howe – Flyers – $425,000

20. Stastny – Nordiques – $414,384

21. MacInnis – Flames – $410,068

22. Sandstrom – Kings – $410,000

23. LaFontaine – Islanders – $400,000

24. Nicholls – Rangers – $400,000

25. Gartner – Capitals – $400,000

25. Carson – Oilers – $400,000